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  • 15 Oct 2014 5:13 PM | Ron Wynn (Administrator)

    It's been more than two months since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis. Since then, Ferguson has become a symbol of national resistance and response to police misconduct and brutality. Hundreds have been arrested, including noted activist and academic Cornell West, while the Department of Justice has launched an investigation into Ferguson's policing policies. A Grand Jury is still deciding whether to indict police officer Darren Wilson for murder. 

  • 15 Oct 2014 5:05 PM | Ron Wynn (Administrator)

    DJ Mustard won four awards at the Oct. 14 Hip-Hop Awards, televised on BET. Drake and Kendrick Lamar won two awards. Common, Jay Electronica and Vince Staples joined Michael Brown's parents in a powerful tribute to their slain son. The event attracted one of the season's biggest audiences to the two-hour plus telecast.

  • 04 Oct 2014 12:52 AM | Anonymous

    Submission Guidelines

    NBPC has a legacy of proudly supporting producers and digital media storytellers who represent the global Black experience. It’s a our goal to provide funding and distribution within our affiliated public media networks including representation on our dedicated online/web series channel BlackPublicMedia.org.

    Our executive producers review and consider films for distribution on a rolling basis. We give priority to films that are current and relevant depicting black life and experience in a unique and often overlooked context, largely ignored by popular culture and films. We work with producers who’ll deliver exciting, entrancing stories and locales in a professional manner.

    To submit to any NBPC open call, or send general content inquiries you must setup an account in our producer’s portal.

    Click here to set up you producer account and apply to NBPC for grants

    Follow us on Facebook, and Twitter to find out the latest about our funding opportunities.


  • 29 Sep 2014 12:52 AM | Ron Wynn (Administrator)
    There are so many good things to report about African Americans. Young people like Walter Thomas are breaking new ground.

    According to jbhe.com., over the past seven years the black student graduation rate has improved at almost all the nation's highest-ranked universities.

    Despite the claims of mainstream media, black youth are on the move. The members of the Chicago Little League team made history and opened doors in baseball.

    Everything Underground mostly highlights only positive events and personalities on our facebook page. Many of our main stories are targeted to feature our new members. We welcome everyone who has recently joined.

    EU will find ways to publicize what you do. On a sad note, let's pray for justice for Dominique Allen, a 15 year old girl and victim of a horrible crime. She was abducted from her sisters' porch, assaulted, killed and set on fire here in Indianapolis. Incidents like this are the primary reason why we must unite. Our youth are under attack from all sides.

    We also have to appreciate one of the city's Pastors. Pastor Jerry

    Hillenburg of Hope Baptist Church stepped up to help Dominique's sisters bury her. ( Dominique's mother passed two years ago). 85 young souls where won to Christ at Dominique's funeral. Dominiques' sisters are seeking justice and have set up a website for tips and donations


  • 29 Sep 2014 12:01 AM | Anonymous


    -------- XXL folds--------
    After 17 years the influential hip-hop publication is folding its print edition. Robert Prince’s Journalisms column had the story that XXL has been purchased by Townsend Media, and that the current issue was its final one in print. It will become a digital-only magazine. But the god news was that the company was offering jobs to all 11 people now on staff, and that it will become one of three publications under the Townsend Media umbrella.

    The other two will be a magazine titled Antenna, aimed at young people, and the return of King, a men’s magazine that had quite an audience at its peak. But the disappearance of XXL means that the three publications which pioneered and at one time dominated the coverage of music, The Source, Vibe and XXL are now digital only. Atlanta-based “Hip Hop Weekly” remains the final survivor, at least in terms of national image and notoriety.

    (On The Media is a weekly overview of events, personalities and issues involving Blacks and print, broadcast and online media. Sources for stories include Richard Prince’s Journalisms, Black America Web, Black Voices/Huffington Post, The Root and various daily publications.).

  • 28 Sep 2014 11:55 PM | Anonymous


    It was only three years ago that Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist Dean Baquet made history by becoming the first Black male or female to attain the status of managing editor at the New York Times. That made him the person directly responsible for the paper’s daily operation. Then in May, Baquet was promoted to executive editor, the organization’s top position. For the first time ever, the New York Times was being run by a Black man.


    Since then, two ugly things have happened on Baquet’s watch. The first was a story about Michael Brown, the young Black man who was killed in Ferguson, Missouri, allegedly while his hands were raised in surrender. The case is now before a Grand Jury, but the Times infuriated Blacks all over the nation with a story headlined “He’s No Angel.”


    The article’s substance intimated that the whole business about Brown about to start college was fabricated to clean up his image, and that in reality he was perennial troublemaker and another of those proverbial “troubled” young Black men. What any of that had to do with Brown being shot trying to surrender didn’t register with anyone other than the writer, and the notion that it’s OK to shoot an unarmed suspect because of reputation or image was even more disturbing. Baquet was never quoted or reported having said anything about the story.


    While that silence bothered some people, it didn't really erupt into a major problem. But that wasn’t the case a couple of weeks ago with a Times story about producer Shonda Rhimes, the only Black woman in television history to get an entire night of programming on a broadcast network.


    Rhimes has three shows on ABC this season. Returning programs “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Scandal,” and newcomer “How To Get Away With Murder.” Times’ television critic Allessandria Stanley opted for one of her trademark satirical/snark columns, with a host of exaggerated references and dubious claims, including one where she offered, to her way of thinking, praise for Rhimes by saying she had succeeded by exploiting the notion of the “Angry Black Woman” stereotype.


    The resulting furor was stunning. All types of Black websites responded with angry criticism of Stanley, the paper and the article. Whether it was Change of Color, Inc., The Root, Black America Web, Black Voices/Huffington Post, even the normally apolitical gossip sites, all were irate that Stanley had taken this approach in profiling the most successful Black female producer (and one of the most prolific and successful, male or female, Black, White or any color) in history. There were calls for an apology, a retraction, even some calls for Stanley’s job.


    Stanley issued a defense of her column, saying that she was really being positive in her approach, using deliberate exaggeration and overstatement to make the point that Rhimes was really putting on an act and actually smashing rather than adhering to stereotypes. But for many readers that was lost in their anger at not only her comments on Rhimes, but those about series star and Oscar nominee Viola Davis.


    Davis had commented prior to Stanley’s article that she wasn’t a classical beauty in the European (white) sense, but Stanley’s paraphrasing of her statements came across to a majority of readers as a putdown or admission that Davis was somehow not beautiful enough to be the central star on a primetime show. Davis herself even responded, as did Rhimes, and their comments got even more negative publicity for the Times, as shows like “Access Hollywood” and “Entertainment Tonight” continued carrying the story and keeping it in the news.


    Finally on Sept. 22 Times’ public editor Margaret Sullivan issued an apology on behalf of the paper, calling the story among other things “tone deaf” and acknowledging that readers “had a right to be upset.” She also said she would begin a conversation shortly with Baquet regarding the fact the Times didn’t have a single Black face among all its cultural critics.


    Elvis Mitchell, Nelson George, Lola Ogunnaike and Kelkefa Sannea are prominent Black writers who’ve had pieces published in the Times over the years, as well as academics like Henry Louis Gates and Cornel West. But only Mitchell, Ogunnaike and Sannea have been Times staffers, and none of them are currently on the paper. The fact that the Times has never had a Black jazz writer is particularly infuriating to a host of top Black musicians, even though there are plenty of topflight Black jazz critics around the nation.


    But what is personally troubling is that Sullivan initiated the conversation with Baquet rather than the other way around. He’s been at the paper for three years, now been in charge since May and he didn’t think a problem like this might happen? Sullivan talked about the paper’s blind spots (three other editors saw and approved the Rhimes story) but the person in charge has not said a word about it to date?


    If that were a white executive editor, I suspect there would have already been plenty of calls for his dismissal. No one wants to be in the position of going after the first Black executive editor in New York Times history, but it also does seem strange that at press time there’s not been one word from him about either situation

    .
    Certainly, Dean Baquet needs more time to straighten out things that were wrong prior to his arrival and his track record is such that one would anticipate he understands the necessity for having Black input and participation in the paper’s cultural coverage, and will do something soon to address that issue.



    On The Media
    By Ron Wynn

    It was only three years ago that Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist Dean Baquet made history by becoming the first Black male or female to attain the status of managing editor at the New York Times. That made him the person directly  responsible for the paper’s daily operation. Then in May, Baquet was promoted to executive editor, the organization’s top position. For the first time ever, the New York Times was being run by a Black man.
    Since then, two ugly things have happened on Baquet’s watch. The first was a story about Michael Brown, the young Black man who was killed in Ferguson, Missouri, allegedly while his hands were raised in surrender. The case is now before a Grand Jury, but the Times infuriated Blacks all over the nation with a story headlined “He’s No Angel.”
    The article’s substance intimated that the whole business about Brown about to start college was fabricated to clean up his image, and that in reality he was perennial troublemaker and another of those proverbial “troubled” young Black men. What any of that had to do with Brown being shot trying to surrender didn’t register with anyone other than the writer, and the notion that it’s OK to shoot an unarmed suspect because of reputation or image was even more disturbing. Baquet was never quoted or reported having said anything about the story.
    While that silence bothered some people, it didn't really erupt into a major problem. But that wasn’t the case a couple of weeks ago with a Times story about producer Shonda Rhimes, the only Black woman in television history to get an entire night of programming on a broadcast network.
    Rhimes has three shows on ABC this season. Returning programs “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Scandal,” and newcomer “How To Get Away With Murder.” Times’ television critic Allessandria Stanley opted for one of her trademark satirical/snark columns, with a host of exaggerated references and dubious claims, including one where she offered, to her way of thinking, praise for Rhimes by saying she had succeeded by exploiting the notion of the “Angry Black Woman” stereotype.
    The resulting furor was stunning. All types of Black websites responded with angry criticism of Stanley, the paper and the article. Whether it was Change of Color, Inc., The Root, Black America Web, Black Voices/Huffington Post, even the normally apolitical gossip sites, all were irate that Stanley had taken this approach in profiling the most successful Black female producer (and one of the most prolific and successful, male or female, Black, White or any color) in history. There were calls for an apology, a retraction, even some calls for Stanley’s job.
    Stanley issued a defense of her column, saying that she was really being positive in her approach, using deliberate exaggeration and overstatement to make the point that Rhimes was really putting on an act and actually smashing rather than adhering to stereotypes. But for many readers that was lost in their anger at not only her comments on Rhimes, but those about series star and Oscar nominee Viola Davis.
    Davis had commented prior to Stanley’s article that she wasn’t a classical beauty in the European (white) sense, but Stanley’s paraphrasing of her statements came across to a majority of readers as a putdown or admission that Davis was somehow not beautiful enough to be the central star on a primetime show. Davis herself even responded, as did Rhimes, and their comments got even more negative publicity for the Times, as shows like “Access  Hollywood” and “Entertainment Tonight” continued carrying the story and keeping it in the news.
    Finally on Sept. 22 Times’ public editor Margaret Sullivan issued an apology on behalf of the paper, calling the story among other things “tone deaf” and acknowledging that readers “had a right to be upset.” She also said she would begin a conversation shortly with Baquet regarding the fact the Times didn’t have a single Black face among all its cultural critics.
    Elvis Mitchell, Nelson George, Lola Ogunnaike and Kelkefa Sannea are prominent Black writers who’ve had pieces published in the Times over the years, as well as academics like Henry Louis Gates and Cornel West. But only Mitchell, Ogunnaike and Sannea have been Times staffers, and none of them are currently on the paper. The fact that the Times has never had a Black jazz writer is particularly infuriating to a host of top Black musicians, even though there are plenty of topflight Black jazz critics around the nation.
    But what is personally troubling is that Sullivan initiated the conversation with Baquet rather than the other way around. He’s been at the paper for three years, now been in charge since May and he didn’t think a problem like this might happen? Sullivan talked about the paper’s blind spots (three other editors saw and approved the Rhimes story) but the person in charge has not said a word about it to date?
    If that were a white executive editor, I suspect there would have already been plenty of calls for his dismissal. No one wants to be in the position of going after the first Black executive editor in New York Times history, but it also does seem strange that at press time there’s not been one word from him about either situation.
    Certainly, Dean Baquet needs more time to straighten out things that were wrong prior to his arrival and his track record is such that one would anticipate he understands the necessity for having Black input and participation in the paper’s cultural coverage, and will do something soon to address that issue.

    -------- XXL folds--------
    After 17 years the influential hip-hop publication is folding its print edition. Robert Prince’s Journalisms column had the story that XXL has been purchased by Townsend Media, and that the current issue was its final one in print. It will become a digital-only magazine. But the god news was that the company was offering jobs to all 11 people now on staff, and that it will become one of three publications under the Townsend Media umbrella.

    The other two will be a magazine titled Antenna, aimed at young people, and the return of King, a men’s magazine that had quite an audience at its peak. But the disappearance of XXL means that the three publications which pioneered and at one time dominated the coverage of music, The Source, Vibe and XXL are now digital only. Atlanta-based “Hip Hop Weekly” remains the final survivor, at least in terms of national image and notoriety.

    (On The Media is a weekly overview of events, personalities and issues involving Blacks and print, broadcast and online media. Sources for stories include Richard Prince’s Journalisms, Black America Web, Black Voices/Huffington Post, The Root and various daily publications.).

  • 28 Sep 2014 11:50 PM | Anonymous

    The husband and wife duo of Gonzales and Aletha Calloway have found a simple, very effective way of creating both wealth and business opportunities for themselves and others in the Indianapolis Black community. The Calloways are National Expansion Leaders for the company 5LINX, a multi-level marketing firm based in Rochester, New York, whose diverse operation covers such areas as utility and telecommunications services, health insurance, nutritional supplements and business services.
    5Linx has amassed some impressive accomplishments since its creation in 2001.


     It's been ranked on Inc, Magazine’s list of the nation’s Top 500 fastest growing private companies the past nine years. They’ve also made the Global 100 list of the top Direct Sales Companies in the world in both 2012 and 2013.


    Gonzales Calloway is a retired military man who’s no stranger to slowly but steadily building something substantive. He achieved his goal of earning a Master’s degree over a 29-year period, starting with an associate’s, then earning the bachelor’s, and finally the master’s. He recommends involvement with 5LINX as a top chance for anyone who’s ambitious, self-motivated and hard working, and says they have the number one thing he values most in both business and life: integrity.


    “They are a good company,” Calloway said during an interview for Everything Underground. “ They pay when they say they will. Now if you break the rules they will take you to court. Integrity is something that cannot be sacrificed.”


    The concept works off the simple base of recruiting five people whom you can trust and are reliable. “You’ve got to find five like minded people,” Calloway adds. “This (direct marketing) is not for everyone. But you find the right five and that’s the key.”


    The Calloways have been involved with 5LINX since 2008, and Mr. Calloway said that the fact the company’s structure doesn’t require mastering intricate techniques makes it the ideal venture.
    “Anyone can do this,” he said. “But there are some things that you have to do. Your associations must change. The things that you put your emphasis on and the way that you spend your time, all those things are key. But once you’ve got the right team and are determined to do what it takes, you can acquire wealth, you can build a sustainable business and you can grow and prosper.”


    With the range of available products being everything from cell phones and computers to security systems and televisions, there’s certainly a lot to sell. Calloway says 5LINX has ambitious plans for the future, and the couple and their various teams in different locales want to be part of it.


    “They (5Linx) want to be a billion dollar company,” he concluded. “Microsoft is sort of their model. But right now they’re looking at the next five years and helping create as many millionaires as possible. That’s something I find very exciting, and want to help others achieve that goal as well.”

    (For more information on 5LINX go to 5linx.net/L365342 or L481818)

  • 28 Sep 2014 11:46 PM | Anonymous
    The annual Freedom Fund Banquet and the 2014 state convention are the major events next month for the NAACP’s local and state branches. The first event marks a historic occasion, while the second brings to the state the organization’s new President and CEO Cornell William Brooks.

    The Greater Indianapolis NAACP Freedom Fund Banquet will be held October 17 at the J.W Marriott in downtown Indianapolis.
    This year’s theme is All In For Justice and Equality, and the banquet marks 100 years of the celebration.  The keynote speaker is Mr. Victor Goode, the Interim Director of Education for the NAACP. 

    For more information call (317) 925-5127.
    The 2014 Indiana NAACP State Conference will be held Oct. 24-26 in  Bloomington. 

    There will also be pre-convention activities Oct. 23. An Ivy Tech Community College Diversity event is being held for MBE’s and WBC’s desiring to do business with Ivy Tech. Also, a special program “Is The Criminal Justice System for Just-Us: a look at the system from 3rd grade to redemption.”

    “Labor Day: Issues and Answers” is set for Oct. 24th. This event includes a Labor Day Luncheon and Award Presentation. There will also be Health Fair Screenings: HIV/AIDS: Blood Pressure and other screenings as well as a public mass meeting.
    The WIN Brunch and Membership Luncheon, along with the freedom Fund Scholarshp & Awards Banquet will conclude the event. The new President & CEO of the NAACP, Cornell William Brooks, will be the featured speaker.

    Workshops and training will also be conducted during the convention. Areas include Economic Sustainability; Health; Voter Protection; Political Action & Representation; Education; Environment and Climate Justice; and Membership.
    For more details and registration contact (219) 614-4891 or barbarabolling@aol.com.


  • 28 Sep 2014 11:44 PM | Anonymous

    Acclaimed young racer Walter Thomas III has a lofty goal. "I want to be the Michael Jordan of auto racing" he proclaims in the YouTube documentary "Chasing The Dream (crafted by the Indianapolis Star newspaper)," and he's well on his way to achieving that goal.


    Following in the footsteps of pioneer and new NASCAR Hall-of-Famer Wendell Scott, Thomas has been behind the wheel of race cars since he was four years old. He's been a 2011 Speedway Track and State Points Indiana Outlaw Asphalt Champion and received the 2012 NASCAR Diversity Young Racer Award..


    Thomas spent seven years in bandoleros after racing four years in midgets and three in junior dragsters. He was recently chosen to participate as a driver for Max Siegel's Rev Racing in Charlotte, North Carolina's Super Shootout's Legend Car Division. Both Bar-B Q Heaven and Max Siegel Inc. Rev Racing Motor Sports Academy are current sponsors. Thomas' #45 car is a familiar sight in Limited Late Model Division stock car racing.


    But he is also an accomplished student. Thomas won an award as a seventh grader for a combination of aptitude, academic achievement and attitude. He has consistently been on the honor roll. A busy and productive individual off the track, Thomas currently does public speaking and is involved in several community activities. These include his involvement in an ongoing campaign against youth violence. He's also a recipient of the "My Brother's Keeper Youth" Award.


    There should be no doubt that someday Walter Thomas III will not only be running, but contending for titles in the Daytona 500 and other prestigious NASCAR events. His work ethic and desire to excel stamp him as a definite future champion and a mentor and inspiration for all young people, especially young blacks who want to succeed in the pressurized and predominantly white world of auto racing.
    Thomas’ next race will be in Anderson Oct. 4th.

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